Ph.D. Included Her Thesis In A Mock Maternity Photo Shoot, Students Related

a month ago

746

cover-phd-included-her-thesis-in-a-mock-maternity-photo-shoot-went-viral

Writing a thesis paper is almost like giving birth to a child. So, Sarah Whelan Curtis drew an analogy by doing a photo shoot with her thesis. Then, she took to Twitter and posted the photos with a caption: "Yes, I did a photo shoot with my thesis. Longest labor ever. #phdlife" The Typical Student team learned what's this all about. 

 

Photo Shoot With A Thesis

 

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-01

 

And here are the photos. Indeed, that looks as if Sarah has just given birth to her first-born: 

 

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-02

Only, instead of an infant, there's a solid ream of paper with two clips:

 

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-04

As told by BoredPanda, Curtis, who is doing her Ph.D. at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia recently finished her thesis on epigenetics. The paper took her 4 years to write. After Curtis' posted her fake maternity pics on Twitter, her post rapidly went viral garnering 252k likes and almost 50k retweets. 

 

How Did Twitterverse React? 

People on Twitter seemed to like the idea, some even adapted it to their own realities.  

 

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-05

 

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-14

 

The Twitterverse is feeling the energy:

 

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-06

 

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-07

 

And of course some sarcasm was thrown in:

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-08

Someone who goes by the username @OxfordDiplomat related to Curtis' experience by tweeting a picture of her with a thesis laying on the steps what looks like a university porch.

 

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-09

 

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-10

 

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-11

 

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-12

Other people also created variations of "baby thesis look":

 

thesis-labor-photoshoot-goes-viral-13

recommended for you

Any questions or propositions?